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 Posted: May 10, 2017 03:51PM
 Edited:  May 10, 2017 04:01PM
Total posts: 287
Last post: Aug 13, 2017
Member since:Oct 22, 2004
Doubt you have any business liability insurance for customers cars or parts so glad you quit smoking and drinking!

 Posted: May 9, 2017 03:25AM
Total posts: 3429
Last post: Aug 18, 2017
Member since:Oct 8, 2011
US
Talking about the fun of moving the fuel tank. Recently I was in a little hurry but wanted to release the right hand rear shock before picking up the kids from band practice. The plan was to remove the strap and cap lean the tank into boot and remove the shock nuts and finish later. As I leaned the tank in the fuel line popped off the tank. I was glad I had removed the spare and carpet from the boot. I managed to place a finger over the tube and remove the tank. I had to run turn on exhaust fan and open doors. Placed tank on 5 gallon bucket out doors to drain and started mopping up fuel. Can't say how many times I have done that before with out an issue. Kind of glad my water heater is electric no pilot light. Steve (CTR)

 Posted: May 8, 2017 10:23PM
 Edited:  May 8, 2017 10:30PM
Total posts: 29
Last post: Aug 15, 2017
Member since:Jul 19, 2016
Finally replaced the rear cones and installed the uprated KYBs. Only was able to take a 10 min spin but I can surely tell the difference. Moving the gas tank was loads of fun but the overall job was pretty easy. Here is a pic of my old spring next to my new one.  Looks like the fronts will be next. 

 Posted: Apr 17, 2017 12:11PM
Total posts: 1824
Last post: Aug 6, 2017
Member since:Aug 29, 2001
Sometime I find that an articulate and observing first timer sees things differently and more completely and answers my own questions better than can be done by an old salt.

I appreciate both ends of the spectrum, which does not extend to trolls.

 Posted: Apr 17, 2017 10:00AM
mur
Total posts: 5639
Last post: Aug 17, 2017
Member since:Nov 12, 1999
So Dan, your expertise is not like someone who has replaced a broken trumpet and knuckle in an hour and been paid for it sort of expertise, but you did it once and now advise the Internet on such matters?

 Posted: Apr 17, 2017 09:18AM
Total posts: 7213
Last post: Aug 18, 2017
Member since:Aug 14, 2002
CA
Alex: Thanks for the clarification.

I only did mine once, a long time ago. But I did use a cone compressor. I was thinking about how others claim to be able to dismantle the front suspension without a cone compressor by taking the upper arm out. I agree absolutely about the new Smooth-a-Ride cones - I could barely get them in with nothing else in the way. Tighter than a bankers....

Side note: When I bought the full Smooth-a-Ride kit, it included knuckle joints, which I had recently previously replaced. I discovered that the adjustable trumpets with the kit required a knuckle with a larger diameter stub. I had to use the ones with the kit.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Apr 16, 2017 02:40AM
Total posts: 9405
Last post: Aug 18, 2017
Member since:Mar 24, 1999
GB
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Moffet
[chop]
 Some people take out the upper suspension arm, which can be time consuming. On the other hand, the pivot shafts and bearings for the upper arms may also be due for replacement. In any case, knuckle joints are inexpensive, so, yes do them, front and back.

Dan, you HAVE to take the top arm out, or you can't get the springs in and out.

Maybe a really badly compressed cone will come out, but without chopping lumps off a new Smootharide cone (and who would be stupic enough to do that) there is no way it will go in.

Metric is for people who can't do fractions...

 Posted: Apr 15, 2017 12:37PM
 Edited:  Apr 15, 2017 10:30PM
Total posts: 29
Last post: Aug 15, 2017
Member since:Jul 19, 2016
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Moffet
It all depends on how you want to drive your Mini. if it is around-town driving/cruising, the genuine Moulton (original spec) will give you the ride originally intended for the Mini. (Moulton designed the suspension.)  If you want a smoother ride than spec, then get the Moulton Smooth-a-Ride cones. Yes, the same designer developed a more compliant ride. They do require adjustable trumpets because the front ones are much taller than stock. In the photo attached, the middle cone is the stock height - used in the Smooth-a-Ride for the rear suspension. The one on the right is the front Smooth-a-Ride cone. The extra height provides a thinner cone wall that is more compliant (absorbs small bumps and roughness better). As you load the car heavier, or turn into a corner the "squishier" compliant part gets compressed and the cone begins to act more like a stock cone. The compromise is more initial body lean in a corner. You notice it more taking corners without slowing down! The cone on the left is an original stock cone with about 20 years or more wear and tear. You can see it is permanently compressed. If you look closely you can see the imprint of the trumpet bell in the top. The rubber also has gotten harder with age. Your rear cones may look and feel like this. Until I changed cones, my car rode more like a lawn tractor.

You ask about ride height: Mostly people lower their car for the cool look. Unless you do considerable modification of the front suspension components, just lowering the ride height messes up the alignment geometry. You need to add adjustable parts to correct for it. A lowered front ride also affects the geometry of the driveshafts.

When you replace the springs, you will need a cone compressor for the front, maybe not to get the old cones out, but almost definitely to get the new ones in. The proper tool makes the job easier and safer. Some people take out the upper suspension arm, which can be time consuming. On the other hand, the pivot shafts and bearings for the upper arms may also be due for replacement. In any case, knuckle joints are inexpensive, so, yes do them, front and back.
Thanks Dan! This was just the info I was looking for. Looks like the smootha ride is more for the Sunday drive with Grandma to the bingo hall. I like to drive in a more spirited manor but I'd like to do it without having to wear a mouth guard. I will have to take a side by side photo once I get the old springs out. Do you, or anyone, have any feedback on the uprated front springs http://www.minimania.com/part/C-STR687/Classic-Austin-Mini-Cooper-S-Cone-Spring-Road-rally-Competition They claim they offer better performance in the curves without an adverse effect on the ride quality. Read somewhere they are for the front only.

 Posted: Apr 15, 2017 10:10AM
Total posts: 7213
Last post: Aug 18, 2017
Member since:Aug 14, 2002
CA
It all depends on how you want to drive your Mini. if it is around-town driving/cruising, the genuine Moulton (original spec) will give you the ride originally intended for the Mini. (Moulton designed the suspension.)  If you want a smoother ride than spec, then get the Moulton Smooth-a-Ride cones. Yes, the same designer developed a more compliant ride. They do require adjustable trumpets because the front ones are much taller than stock. In the photo attached, the middle cone is the stock height - used in the Smooth-a-Ride for the rear suspension. The one on the right is the front Smooth-a-Ride cone. The extra height provides a thinner cone wall that is more compliant (absorbs small bumps and roughness better). As you load the car heavier, or turn into a corner the "squishier" compliant part gets compressed and the cone begins to act more like a stock cone. The compromise is more initial body lean in a corner. You notice it more taking corners without slowing down! The cone on the left is an original stock cone with about 20 years or more wear and tear. You can see it is permanently compressed. If you look closely you can see the imprint of the trumpet bell in the top. The rubber also has gotten harder with age. Your rear cones may look and feel like this. Until I changed cones, my car rode more like a lawn tractor.

You ask about ride height: Mostly people lower their car for the cool look. Unless you do considerable modification of the front suspension components, just lowering the ride height messes up the alignment geometry. You need to add adjustable parts to correct for it. A lowered front ride also affects the geometry of the driveshafts.

When you replace the springs, you will need a cone compressor for the front, maybe not to get the old cones out, but almost definitely to get the new ones in. The proper tool makes the job easier and safer. Some people take out the upper suspension arm, which can be time consuming. On the other hand, the pivot shafts and bearings for the upper arms may also be due for replacement. In any case, knuckle joints are inexpensive, so, yes do them, front and back.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Apr 15, 2017 09:37AM
Total posts: 29
Last post: Aug 15, 2017
Member since:Jul 19, 2016
I can't find any indication in the pile of paperwork that the rubber springs were ever replaced. It was suggested here that sometime hi lows were installed to compensate for old springs. That doesn't really make sense, the cones are not that much money and don't you have to remove them to fit high lows?. I have decided that I'll change the cones at the same time I install my new shocks. Outside of being able to adjust the height is there any other benefit to a high low setup? I'm fine with the stock height, whatever that is. Should I go back to an original setup and if so what parts would I need in order to go back to original? Should I replace the knuckle when I install the new rubber spring? I took the Mini on a drive the other day and the rear suspension is mind jarring. It almost makes it no fun to drive. Maybe I have some sort of rally / competition spring. Only way to find out is to remove it and look and I might as well fit a new one in the process.

 Posted: Apr 6, 2017 08:43AM
 Edited:  Apr 6, 2017 09:17AM
Total posts: 836
Last post: Aug 18, 2017
Member since:Aug 9, 2016
i did ....  i converted my 39yr old rubber cone to a spanking shiny blue spring suspension and KYB shocks(the one with the red sticker on the side), i love the rideability in the beginning but as i drive it more, it feels like i am sitting on a water bed everytime i turn, so what i did was to intstall an anti sway bar(or anti rollbar as ATV people calls it) ,,,then the water bed phenomenon went away., i felt more secure and i can really feel the tire traction to the road.  if you want a spring suspension that feels like a rubber cone, get the red one.....and if you want a spring suspension that feels like there's no spring, then get the green one.(very stiff,everytme you hit a rough road, you can feel the vibration straight to your brain)........ so i guess blue is the best bet ,,imo
...and oh, you need to use an oversized rebound rubber stopper thingy to prevent the spring from falling off when you jack the car up.   unless you jack the car in the lower side panel like what some guy i know does.

 Posted: Apr 6, 2017 08:00AM
 Edited:  Apr 6, 2017 08:02AM
Total posts: 29
Last post: Aug 15, 2017
Member since:Jul 19, 2016
I'm trying to find the middle ground between drive and comfort. Can't you just tell me what that is without seeing or being in the car? 

 Posted: Apr 6, 2017 07:52AM
Total posts: 9405
Last post: Aug 18, 2017
Member since:Mar 24, 1999
GB

I've done many tens of thousands of miles on red springs, and would recommend them for comfort but not sportiness.

Based on my experience, I'd never fit the blue ones as there's load hauling limitations and body roll issues with the red ones which are harder.

Somewhere, if you do the right search, I wrote an essay about different springing mediums in the real world with direct comparisons possible.

Metric is for people who can't do fractions...

 Posted: Apr 6, 2017 07:33AM
Total posts: 29
Last post: Aug 15, 2017
Member since:Jul 19, 2016
Hey guys, bringing this thread back from the dead. I've been dealing with some issues with my 'regular' car and so the Mini has taken a back seat. I've discovered I have Gaz shortened shocks. I'm sure this doesn't help with rebound bounce. I'm seriously thinking of replacing them with a set of the upgraded KYBs. Question I have now is anyone upgraded from cone to spring suspension? I'm looking at the blue spring conversion. Any feedback on overall drivability of springs?

 Posted: Jan 16, 2017 01:44AM
Total posts: 9405
Last post: Aug 18, 2017
Member since:Mar 24, 1999
GB

It could be an optical delusion, but the photo you posted appears to show an area of tyre rubbing on the wheelarch between 12-2 o'clock.

Jack the back up half an inch and see if the ride gets better.

If it does, you'll need to consider narrower wheels or getting the rear arches tubbed if you wish to retain the slammed stance.

Oh, and to reiterate, Specialist isn't.

Ignore pretty much all of his ill-informed and often dangerous ramblings.

Metric is for people who can't do fractions...

 Posted: Jan 14, 2017 02:09PM
 Edited:  Jan 14, 2017 02:30PM
jeg
Total posts: 7061
Last post: Jul 21, 2017
Member since:Apr 25, 2000
Image Gallery
Quote:
Originally Posted by specialist
Quote:
Originally Posted by Derramax
And also to determine the exact ride height you need to remove the wheel arches.  You see? Someone thought that you set yours very low, when in fact not.   
Nonsense...

I suggest you do some reading, check your Haynes and ignore the troll...

SUSPENSION - Basic set-up method 

Many more articles in Calver's Corner, as well as our host's Articles pages:

Articles 

Quote:
Originally Posted by h_lankford
For all the talk here about the shocks, isn't the main purpose of shocks is to reduce rebound AFTER the bump and compression of the rubber cone ( or spring). Low profile tires are likely a big part of the problem, as stated. Why not reduce the pressure to a ridiculously low amount, say 18 lbs, take a short drive and not at high speed or snappy turns that might peel the tires off the rim. ANY tire would ride smoother doing this, but it might give you some clue. Replacing tires is cheaper than replacing cones unless you can do it yourself. Just a thought. 
Pretty much spot on -

Shock Absorbers (dampers), Basic Knowledge 

Without seeing the relationship between front and rear, my guess is that it's your rubber-band tires.  A switch to 12" (165/60/12 tires) if you've got big 8.4" disk brakes up front and don't want to change them, or to 10" wheels if 7.5" disks (or drums) will no doubt be more compliant.  

For reference, these (mine) are 12", summer and winter setups.  I trimmed my bumpstops (lower than original-height car) to allow for extra suspension travel.

The peasants are revolting...          

"Gone with the Wind" - a brief yet moving vignette concerning lactose intolerance

 Posted: Jan 14, 2017 11:02AM
Total posts: 836
Last post: Aug 18, 2017
Member since:Aug 9, 2016
Quote:
Originally Posted by Derramax
And also to determine the exact ride height you need to remove the wheel arches.  You see? Someone thought that you set yours very low, when in fact not.   

 Posted: Jan 14, 2017 09:09AM
Total posts: 1824
Last post: Aug 6, 2017
Member since:Aug 29, 2001
For all the talk here about the shocks, isn't the main purpose of shocks is to reduce rebound AFTER the bump and compression of the rubber cone ( or spring). Low profile tires are likely a big part of the problem, as stated. Why not reduce the pressure to a ridiculously low amount, say 18 lbs, take a short drive and not at high speed or snappy turns that might peel the tires off the rim. ANY tire would ride smoother doing this, but it might give you some clue. Replacing tires is cheaper than replacing cones unless you can do it yourself. Just a thought. 

 Posted: Jan 14, 2017 08:59AM
 Edited:  Jan 14, 2017 02:59PM
Total posts: 7213
Last post: Aug 18, 2017
Member since:Aug 14, 2002
CA
Quote:
Originally Posted by Derramax
I was thinking that seeing as I have high lows it is quite possible the car is lowered with short Gaz shocks. I dont have much to base this on measurement wise but is there a spot on the car where I could measure and see its height vs stock? OT: How do you quote a previous comment? Everytime i hit the quote button it gives me a blank responce field. Maybe you have to have posted X amount of times before it's allowed?
When you hit the "quote post" button, it takes a while to load (on my computer anyway). The quoted post first appears as code that eventually sorts itself out and looks like the attached image. It may not work for you depending on the device you are using to access the board.

The suspension height is usually measured between the top of the tire and the apex of the wheel arch. On original Minis without plastic wheel arches the exact measurement was sometimes done from the centre of the wheel hub to the apex of the arch. At one shop (about a half century ago ) the guy adjusting my hydrolastic had a welding rod with a short "L" at the bottom to go into the hub centre and a piece of tape to mark the position for the wheel arch.

A rule of thumb (fingers actually) is to have 2-3 fingers clearance at the front and slightly more at the back - the rear is supposed to be a bit higher. Of curse it all depends on the size of your fingers. The car in your avatar looks low.

.

"Hang on a minute lads....I've got a great idea."

 Posted: Jan 14, 2017 08:50AM
 Edited:  Jan 14, 2017 08:52AM
Total posts: 29
Last post: Aug 15, 2017
Member since:Jul 19, 2016

Found 49 Messages

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